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readthebloodybook:

lovingmyfangirllife:

Hey guys so i’ve seen other people try this and thought i would try it. I was suppose to switch schools this year but my mom changed her mind and now i cant, and now the only way her and Joe will let me switch for sophomore year is if this gets 30,000 notes. I got bullied so much last year that i went back in the closet and i’ve talked to the principal of the school my mom is making me go to and he cant to anything about bullying because of “religious freedom”. I went on a tour of the school I want to go to and met who my classmates would be and i feel completely safe there, while at the school my mom wants me to go to I dont feel safe and my anxiety is worse. So maybe we can get enough notes on this for me to transfer? 

This is a serious example of really poor parenting. Don’t allow your child to continue to suffer needlessly until 30,000 strangers tell you to stop.

bobbycaputo:

SD Holman’s Portraits Of Female Masculinity In BUTCH: Not Like The Other Girls

Photographer SD Holman uses her talent as a portrait photographer to capture women who fall outside of the traditional gender binary. In her series “BUTCH: Not Like the Other Girls,” masculine women are not oddity or other. These are photos of women who identify as butch captured by a butch woman—they are women defining themselves. In this way, Butch has much in common with the current social campaigns stripping women of makeup, enhancements, and retouching and declaring them more beautiful without the artifice. This is part of Holman’s intent with the show—to use the Butch identity as an example of one of the classifications through which women are objectified. The difference though is the hate and fear that Butch women have faced as transgressors of societal constructs of femininity. Holman says:

“Butches and all gender variant folk walk in a world that is really hostile to them, so we tend to look inward.  I was inspired to show their beauty by my wife Catherine, a femme who loved butches, and encouraged me to do this when I started talking about it.”

(Continue Reading)

The thing is that if someone is being shamed, stigmatized, bullied etc. for being fat, and we say “they aren’t fat” or “they aren’t even that fat” in their defense, what we are also saying is that there is a size at which they would deserve that treatment, and that’s just not true.

Countering fat shaming by denying fatness says that the person doesn’t deserve poor treatment (which is true) but at the expense of reinforcing the incorrect idea that they would deserve it if they were fat (or some greater degree of fat), or that being called fat is an insult. There is no size at which people deserve to be treated poorly.

She’s Not That Fat | Dances With Fat (via brutereason)

and this is why i get upset when people say “you’re not fat” whenever i say something about my weight. 

(via officialjeffgoldblum)

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